D-Day 75th Anniversary

UP FRONT by Bill Mauldin

Editor's Note: This story was written by an 11-year-old visiting Normandy, France for the first time.
In May, 2018 Henry Tamblin and his daughter found Bernard Sandler’s Army dogtag on a beach near where they live in Cornwall, England. Bernard Sandler, born January 19, 1912, was a soldier in the U.S. Army during World War II, stationed in Cornwall.
WASHINGTON (Tribune News Service) — Jimmy Farmer Sr. sat in front of the crowd gathered at the French Embassy in Washington, looking spiffy in his dark blue jacket, white shirt and patriotic tie.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (Tribune News Service) — You can pile up a lot of memories in 97 years, but for Albuquerque’s Bill Norris, who reached that mark on Jan. 31, some of the most vivid go back 75 years.
Juan Pujol Garcia, code-named "Garbo," is considered one of the heroes of D-Day. But he didn't land on the beaches of Normandy in 1944 nor fight on the front lines of World War II.
KETTERING, Ohio (Tribune News Service) — A World War II B-24 bomber gunner and longtime Kettering resident will receive the Congressional Gold Medal for his military service.
NEW YORK — A flood of copy from correspondents who actually went into France with the invasion forces hit American newspapers Thursday giving a detailed picture and the price the Allies paid in cracking it.
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE — "The major battle in France is joined," it was declared here today as Allied liberation troops fought inland from captured Bayeux on the Cherbourg peninsula in France, five miles from the coast.
Three words — which didn't mention "invasion," "Second Front," "landing in Europe" or "beachhead" — revealed in London at 8 AM Tuesday the first news of the invasion of Western Europe by Allied forces.