PCS

Willkommen in Deutschland! Welcome to Germany! If you’ve recently arrived, your head may be spinning from a combination of jetlag and the sheer amount of information coming your way. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Moving overseas is a big change with a lot of moving pieces.
Congratulations! Your orders are in, and you have one of the military's coveted "good deals": Hawaii, Germany, Japan. Your friends are jealous as you imagine all kinds of travel, food, and new adventures.
When visions of a cat wearing a top hat, balancing on a ball and juggling a slew of household items enter your mind, you've either just received your overseas orders or you've read the same children's book too many times.
Father’s Day is a day to remember all the hardworking, selfless efforts dads make to keep us happy. However, you and your family living overseas means missing out on special occasions, like this important day.
Last year, Catherine started a new job. It wasn’t a full-time position, but after years of unemployment, it was a personal milestone. With five previous PCSes ranging from Germany to Philadelphia, Catherine was finally able to focus on her own career.
We all make assumptions based on stereotypes and experiences. Over the years, I’ve gotten used to following the lead of my superstar wife, an Army civilian employee with a Ph.D. and an additional doctorate degree … not to mention a great singing voice.
With so many traditions and usually corresponding festivals, it can be difficult to keep track. Johannistag (St. John’s Day) is one not to overlook while you’re stationed in Germany!
I can remember my first permanent change of station (PCS) vividly. My husband and I had been married six months and were about to uproot from northern California to the bustling metropolis of San Antonio. I had no clue where to start or what pieces of the puzzle I was responsible for.
Much like requirements of Good Samaritan laws in the United States, drivers in Germany have a responsibility to render aid.
Spring symbolizes new growth, renewal, and optimism. We see the signs of change around us as the days grow longer, the temperature gets warmer, and the flowers begin to bloom. For military families, spring signifies change as PCS season is among us.
Moving to Europe was only the beginning of our adventure when my husband and I arrived. Transferring from our last base to a new unit and country was also challenge. We were embracing civilian life for the first time after his transition out of the army.
The U.S. Armed Forces in Europe require that U.S. servicemembers and dependents comply with host-nation child safety seat laws. According to the European Commission, member states must enforce child safety seat laws with the minimum requirements.
For some people, it is so hard to leave your friends and family behind as you embark on your military career or you move to be with a servicemember.
PCSing to a foreign country is stressful enough for families. When you couple that with trying to find employment, it can be a nerve-wracking and frustrating process. Overseas, jobs are scarce for military spouses, especially in Italy where there are far stricter rules for working abroad.
It’s a beautiful spring morning and you sit down at the wheel, braced for your morning commute. You pull out into what’s usually a congested road to find it almost eerily devoid of traffic. It’s then you realize that your German neighbors must be celebrating yet another holiday.
Welcome to the U.K.! If you’ve recently arrived, your head may be spinning from a combination of jetlag and the sheer amount of information coming your way. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Moving overseas is a big change with a lot of moving pieces. To help make your transition to the U.K.