PCS

Willkommen in Deutschland! Welcome to Germany! If you’ve recently arrived, your head may be spinning from a combination of jetlag and the sheer amount of information coming your way. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Moving overseas is a big change with a lot of moving pieces.
In America, breaking a mirror is said to bring seven years of bad luck, while knocking on wood prevents such luck. Curious to know what superstitions Europeans believe in? Check out this list and see if you see the locals adhere to these rules during your travels!  
For many years, colorful Sesame Street characters like Elmo and Big Bird have helped children learn while having fun.
When space-available health services at MTFs are not available for U.S. citizens living in Germany, patients may be referred to host-nation providers. Or, if you are a DOD civilian or contractor, receiving treatment at a MTF may not be an option and you must seek treatment on the economy.
When military life takes you away from home, you and your family can use an absentee ballot and ensure your voices are heard on Election Day. It only takes a few quick steps to cast your vote no matter where you are in the world:
Getting Started with Absentee Voting
When you first move to Germany, you are completely overwhelmed with the new place, new culture and new language. It’s a bit intimidating to say the least.
Military life is such a transient one. We move every three to five years, which sometimes leaves spouses looking for a new job just as often. This can be extremely challenging!
When you think of Italy, it’s easy for the mind to wander first to images of rolling hills in Tuscany, romantic canals in Venice and the summery seascapes of the Amalfi Coast.
I walked through the rooms of our Texas home as if in a daze. My husband had presented me with orders to an OCONUS duty station a few days before, and I was trying to imagine what our furnishings might look like in European house.
Between the jetlag, sleep-deprived family members and for some, anxious pets, the journey to your new overseas duty station is perhaps not as organized as it ought to be. Ideally, this would never happen, but let’s be real. PCSing to another country is stressful and often times difficult.
European windows don’t usually have screens like we’re used to in the United States. Since we don’t have air conditioning, we have to open the windows more often. That means those flies, mosquitos, bees and other insects have a chance to get in.
Documentation and equipment
PCSing is a major hurdle to jump no matter your age, whether you have done it a thousand times, or it’s your first time leaving home. Things become even more complicated once you go off to college.
As a military kid, moving becomes a state of mind. It’s not unusual or unnatural to finish high school having attended at least two high schools or realize your vernacular has changed based on where you’ve lived. That’s just the life of a military kid.
Imagine you just moved and then find out your partner's deploying. Don't worry, you can handle it, and there's support when you need it. Here are some tips to help you get through this:
• Make new friends (or at least know people you can count on).
• Get out there and explore.
Whether it’s a PCS, TDY or short vacation for a few days or weeks, there are simple techniques that will help you minimize the effects you’ll inevitably feel when exposed to a new culture.