Whenever we get visitors, I’m proud to show them around the handsome wine village I now call home. First mentioned in a document dating back to 765, my adopted town has more than its fair share of landmarks and history.
Bastogne is a picturesque European town perched on the edge of the Ardennes Forest of Belgium.
Only five months into the raging battles of World War I, an unofficial Christmas truce occurred in the No Man’s Land between German, French and British forces along the Western Front. Singing Christmas carols, the soldiers climbed out of the trenches and forged small bonds of brotherhood.
Belgium is a country of peaceful farmland, canals and charming small towns. But, due to its location between France and Germany, it was the site of terrible fighting in both World War I and World War II.
GRAFENWOEHR, Germany — U.S. soldiers and their families followed in the footsteps of the famous Company E when they visited World War II battlefields to mark the 73rd anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge this weekend.
St. Nicholas Day was approaching in 1944 when Harry Stutz and Richard Brookins, corporals in the U.S. Army's 28th Infantry Division, arrived in newly liberated Luxembourg.
The Bastogne War Museum, opened in the spring of 2014, gives the visitor a personal experience of the Battle of the Bulge, as exhibits trace the history of World War II and what led to it.
FORT BELVOIR, Va. - The old battle tank arrived at 10:15 Thursday morning, covered in a black tarp and chained to the bed of tractor trailer.
For years, Sharon Schell tried to get her father to talk about his experiences in World War II, but he kept them to himself.
Bastogne, the name of the small town of the Belgian Ardennes, is forever associated with the Battle of the Bulge and the incredible resistance of famous American units, among them the Screaming Eagles of the 101st Airborne Division.