Go behind the scenes of 'Shaun the Sheep' at the Frankfurt Film Museum

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Go behind the scenes of 'Shaun the Sheep' at the Frankfurt Film Museum

by: Jerry Allison | .
Stripes Europe | .
published: November 30, 2016

I realize that “Shaun the Sheep” is a TV show meant for kids. However, I’ve fallen in love with it. Shaun and his band of sheep, plus Blitzer, have been constantly on my Netflix list and on my TV, causing my husband to hate the opening song. And when I found out that the Film Museum in Frankfurt had an Art of Aardman exhibit, I had to go.

Nestled along the Main River, the Deutsches Filminstitut is a hop and skip from downtown — easily accessible on the weekend, when parking is free. The museum is just three floors, but jam-packed full of film history and memorabilia, as well as a rotating temporary exhibit.

 

The first floor is all about the history of film. You go through the history of moving pictures, flipbooks and more. It’s very interactive, allowing you to experience what film was like in the early 1900s. And don’t worry, everything is in English and German. I personally loved the interactive part of it; being able to touch and see history is always a plus in my book.

The second floor is all about acting and the narrative of film. You’ll see costumes, scripts, storyboards and more. The interactive portion includes picking out audio for certain scenes and experiencing special effects with a green screen. I must note, I could have stayed on this floor FOREVER because of (1) the Darth Vader helmet used in “The Empire Strikes Back,” (2) the storyboard from Roy Carnon, and (3) the snippets of films featured in a panoramic set-up.

 

The third floor is the temporary exhibit; the Art of Aardman is there now to Jan. 29, 2017. You’ll be able to experience much more than just “Shaun the Sheep;” you’ll also see “Chicken Run” and “Wallace & Gromit.” The exhibit previews storyboards, how the characters are made, scenes from movies and TV show, plus much more. It was fascinating to see as a “Shaun the Sheep” fan. One doesn’t realize the amount of work that goes into the video shorts and the amount of time involved.

The museum is great for adults and kids. It is open Tuesday to Sunday; hours vary by day. The permanent exhibit is 6 euros for adults, 3 euros for students and children. The temporary exhibit is 7 euros for adults, 5 euros for students and 4 euros for children. A combined price is given at the ticket counter.

In addition, the museum offers movies. American screen buffs can watch Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy movies in December. Movie tickets are 7 euros for adults, 5 euros for students, and 3 euros for handicapped visitors. You can also become a friend of the cinema for a year; prices vary by membership.

Find out more by visiting the film museum’s website

Images by Jerry Allison

 

Tags: museum, Frankfurt, history, Shaun the Sheep, Netflix, English, german, exhibit, Aardman, Chicken Run, Wallace, Gromit, Children, Kids, TV, Movie, Film, Filminstitut, Institute
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