Robot gives surgeons a steady hand at Landstuhl

Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes
From Stripes.com
Surgeons at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany perform a prostate surgery on March 1, 2016, using the da Vinci surgical system, a robot with surgical tools that they can manipulate from a computer console. Jennifer H. Svan/Stars and Stripes

Robot gives surgeons a steady hand at Landstuhl

by: Jennifer H. Svan | .
Stars and Stripes | .
published: September 06, 2016

LANDSTUHL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER, Germany — When Koral Guess had to have her gallbladder removed, she figured her options would be laproscopic or open surgery.

Her doctor at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center presented a third choice: robotic surgery, whereby a surgeon performs the operation by controlling a robot.

Guess opted for the robot, sold on the “lot less risk (of infection), faster recovery” pitch. Four tiny incisions later, her gallbladder was out. She was home the same day and ready to go back to work two days later.

Read more at Stripes.com

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