Global cuisine: Copenhagen street food

Global cuisine: Copenhagen street food

by: Jason Park | .
Stripes Europe | .
published: August 08, 2016

Copenhagen is a city with cheap hot dog vendors on every corner as well as expensive restaurants. With a whole island dedicated to ethnic eateries, it has one of the most vibrant street food scenes in northern Europe.

Street food is a budget-friendly alternative to pricey restaurant dishes in Copenhagen, but it’s still delicious. If you’re looking to taste global cuisine, or to satisfy your hunger, Copenhagen’s food vendors are just what you need.

However, you don’t have time, or stomach space, to sample all of Copenhagen’s street food vendors. Since there are too many stalls to try, here’s a list of the more popular, and my favorite, stalls in Copenhagen.

DØP

Hot dogs are to Copenhagen what frites are to Brussels. Arguably the best hot dog stand in the city, DØP sells organic hot dogs slathered with sauces and pickles. Conveniently located near the Round Tower and Church of The Holy Ghost, you can visit two major attractions and enjoy a heavenly treat. Everything is organic, from the sauces to the soft drinks. DØP also offers vegetarian hot dogs and other alternative meats. Although the stand is slightly more expensive than others in the city, this hot dog is worth the extra dollar or two.

Papirøen Island

Not a stall, but an island dedicated to street food, Papirøen Island (Paper Island) is home to a warehouse full of ethnic food vendors from all over the world. There is something for everybody, from traditional Danish smørrebrød (open rye-bread sandwiches) to Korean bulgogi. The island isn’t just limited to main dishes either; there are various bars, coffee shops and dessert places as well.

There are tables located in front of the warehouse where you can dine. The view of the Opera house, the Royal Playhouse and Copenhagen’s harbor is a nice bonus to your tasty meal.

Some of the most popular stands include: 

• Copper & Wheat. The French owners are known for cooking enjoyable homemade cuisine. The authentic Belgian fries, double-fried in duck fat, are the stuff of legend. They are made with fresh potatoes and are undeniably savory. Their menu of traditional French cuisine changes weekly, but these fries are always available.  

• Fisch Art. A couple from Berlin sells burgers with different meats and fish. The house specialty is the Surf & Turf Burger with beef, whisky onions and king prawns — a greasy delight. In addition to burgers, they sell sweet potato fries. While the fries from Copper & Wheat are delightful, Fisch Art’s version satisfies your sweet tooth and complement the burgers.

• Bulko. One of the few places in Copenhagen where you can get authentic Korean food, this stand sells tasty and spicy Korean dishes, both street food and traditional, with a modern twist. Bulgogi, a mixture of pork, beef and sauces, is a national dish and a must-try at Bulko. As someone who frequently eats Korean cuisine, I can say that this stand maintains the traditional taste, even though it caters to younger crowds. 

• Marrakech. This family-owned stand sells authentic, Moroccan-inspired flat bread. The line for this stand is especially long, and with good reason. The core menu, the flatbreads, is simply delicious. Toppings include hummus, spinach, cheese and homemade hot sauce. The ingredients are fresh, and the bread is baked in front of your eyes. You can feel the warmth of the bread as you eat the chewy, yet paradoxically, crunchy goodness. For those who have never tried Moroccan cuisine before, this is a good place to start.

Tags: food, Copenhagen, Denmark, Europe, Eating, dining, cuisine, Ethnic, Global, authentic, Street Food, budget
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